The 1930’s Yellow Bungalow Restoration

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Rehab Addict: The 1930’s Yellow Bungalow Restoration

A REO bank owned home, one of the many that suffered with the worst foreclosure periods in decades. With a passion for history and the beautiful craftsmanship of the 20’s, I fell in love with the era of this 1930’s home. HGTV, a popular T.V network has a great series of popular television shows that inspired me to turn my dreams into reality! There are soo many homes with history that are being condemned and sent for demolition by the city, no one will invest time in restoring historic homes to their former glory. These homes tell a story of the past and the people who lived in that era. No one appreciates history as much as it deserves, the past is part of who we are today. Over-time these building’s deteriorate leaving behind the craftsmanship and beauty of the past. What will be left to remember?

Old Home Restoration: The 1930’s Yellow Bungalow Restoration

I purchased this home on October 18, 2013; I saw an opportunity behind the faux wood paneling, underneath the plywood and above the dropped ceiling. A little elbow grease and much-needed TLC is what this home was deprived of. Despite people telling me “it’s not worth it” just pushed me to prove them wrong. I’d like to point out whomever owned the house prior to me taking ownership; destroyed an original window, cut into all original woodwork and covered original wood floors with plywood.

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Gut Renovation: The 1930’s Yellow Bungalow Restoration

The choices:

  1. A complete gut
  2. A band-aid fix

It takes real sweat equity to strip a house down to the studs, then build it back up again. While, it takes an imprudent person to cover necessary problems that should be addressed. I chose to go for a complete gut, to do it right the very first time. Three dumpster loads later of plaster and wood lathe:

Some studs need to be replaced due to termite damage:

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Exposing the original brick in the kitchen(a work-in-progress):

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Perfect wood floors:

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Decided to leave the ceiling exposed:

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Continue to follow the progress of my 1930 Florida Bungalow Restoration by following my Blog! Helpful tips & advice are always appreciated 🙂

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2 thoughts on “The 1930’s Yellow Bungalow Restoration

  1. I am looking at renovating my Grandmother’s 1923 famhouse and I am going to leave most of the original plaster walls as they are in great shape but I do need to take down the ceilings. My question is did you need to test for asbestos in the plaster or was it not an issue?

    • Hello Shane!

      That is awesome that you are renovating your Grandmother’s 1923 farmhouse, would love to see pictures! Asbestos in the plaster was not an issue, I have a friend who is a licensed contractor take a look around to make sure there was no asbestos in the home. Maybe have someone come out and look? The only reason I busied the plaster is because I needed to clean out the termite remains in my walls, as well as fix termite damage. Are you leaving the ceiling exposed?

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